Carers" attributions for challenging behaviour
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Carers" attributions for challenging behaviour a replication study. by Suzanne McHugh

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Published by The author] in [s.l .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Thesis (M. Sc. (Applied Psychology)) - University of Ulster, 2003.

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18707943M

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  Measures Attributions. Direct support staff completed the translated version of the Challenging Behaviour Attributions Scale (CHABA; Hastings, ; translated version Lambrechts, Kuppens, & Maes, ).The questionnaire consists of 33 items, each of which states a possible reason as to why a person with intellectual disability may engage in challenging by: 3.   Sophie Williams, Dave Dagnan, Jacqui Rodgers, Kathryn McDowell, Changes in Attributions as a Consequence of Training for Challenging and Complex Behaviour for Carers of People with Learning Disabilities: A Systematic Review, Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, /jx, 25, 3, (), ().Cited by: Stanley, B., & Standen, P. J. (). Carers’ Attributions for Challenging Behaviour. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 39, Also, to compare care staff attributions, emotions, optimism, willingness to help and observed helping behaviours for self-injurious behaviours in comparison to other forms of challenging.

Sophie Williams, Dave Dagnan, Jacqui Rodgers, Kathryn McDowell, Changes in Attributions as a Consequence of Training for Challenging and Complex Behaviour for Carers of People with Learning Disabilities: A Systematic Review, Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, /jx, 25, 3, (), ().   Victoria L. Lucas, Suzanne Collins, Peter E. Langdon, The Causal Attributions of Teaching Staff Towards Children with Intellectual Disabilities: A Comparison of ‘Vignettes’ Depicting Challenging Behaviour with ‘Real’ Incidents of Challenging Behaviour, Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, /j For example, MacKinlay and Langdon () compared attributions for sexual offending behaviour to attributions for challenging behaviour (operationalized as aggressive behaviour) using the.   Hastings and Remington (a) argued that care staff beliefs about the causes of challenging behavior (i.e., the causal attributions that they make—conceptualized as rules governing staff behavior) are likely to be predictive of staff counter-habilitative behavior. Therefore, these beliefs might be an appropriate focus for intervention that.

  'Challenging' behaviours are common among people with intellectual disabilities, resulting in significantly reduced quality of life. These may include aggression, self-injury, destructiveness, hyperactivity and inappropriate social conduct. This new edition provides a concise, accessible and contemporary summary of current knowledge about challenging behaviour, drawn from psychology. Levels of challenging behaviour in people with intellectual disabilities are predictive of burn-out in support staff. Staff well-being is affected by the level of challenging behaviour in those they care for. Organisational factors and challenging behaviour Authors of the recent CQC inspection programme of learning disability services commented. This paper reviews the evidence for changes in carers' attributions regarding the behaviour of people with intellectual disabilities as a consequence of carer training in challenging and complex. of over 1, results for Books: "challenging behaviour" Managing Challenging Behaviour The effect of relocation on people with learning disabilities and challenging behaviour and a descriptive analysis of the relationship between service user and staff behaviour Currently unavailable. Carers' perceptions of challenging behaviour.